The White Edit

Ireland

Dublin

overview

The Emerald Isle is a magical location for a wedding, from the icy loveliness of the Killarney Lakes in Kerry, to the windswept cliffs of Howth near Dublin. Sophistication and style meet cultural warmth and raw beauty in this historic and passionate place to get wed.

the lowdown

It was Irish poet WB Yeats who said “I have spread my dreams under your feet. Tread softly because you tread on my dreams” and this ethereal, magical sense of romance pervades throughout both the north and the south in Ireland. The wealth of historic castles continue the fairytale feel and provide incredible choice for anyone picking a wedding venue in Ireland. Of course you don’t have to get hitched in a historic castle if that’s not your bag – private estates, shabby chic barns and even a 17th century Dublin theatre are all options too. The Irish government will even hire you a national monument if you ask really really nicely.

Although Irish cuisine is historically potato-heavy, this island is abundant with fresh produce that will make the most mouthwatering wedding feast. It’s also going through something of a culinary renaissance with Michelin starred restaurants (16+) and a growing band of artisans cultivating a modern take on traditional eats, from refined cheeses to organic cured salmon and whiskey smoked meats.

And then there’s the booze. You may not want to drink Guinness on your big day (although it may well help with the hangover the day after) but there’s plenty of other choice, from a craft cider to Irish wine from the vineyards in County Cork.

Wedding traditions here are strong, and plentiful. At TWE, we particularly love to see a groom in a kilt of Irish tartan – and the traditional fruit cake, soaked in whiskey, is hard to beat as a wedding cake.

A destination wedding in Ireland offers many choices, from the magical and refined to the rowdy and fun. One thing you can always guarantee is the warmth of hospitality that will get any wedding off to a great start.

insider note...

Go local when it comes to your wedding entertainment and get your guests dancing to some energetic folk tunes with the music provided by a live band. Ceili dances and The Haymaker’s Jig are ideal for involving everyone and leaving self-consciousness on the sidelines. Alternatively, opt for an elegant harpist to play your guests to dinner with traditional Irish melodies.

Flight Duration

Approx 1 hr 20

Currency

Euro in the South, UK pound in the North.

Language Spoken

English and Irish.

Vaccinations

n/a

Transportation

Neither Belfast nor Dublin has a metro system (yet) but busesare plentiful in both these cities, and right across the island. All but the smallest towns have taxis, either private cars or black cabs

Public Holidays

Throughout the country, religious holidays such as Easter and Christmas are taken off work. St Patrick's Day (17th March), May Day (7th May) and bank holidays in June (4th) and August (6th) are also traditional.

good to know

Much like England, Ireland generally makes no promises with the weather. July and August are the warmest months, with 18 hours of daylight eventually turning dark after 11pm.

the marriage

THE WHITE EDIT'S BRIEF GUIDE TO GETTING MARRIED IN IRELAND

You can legally marry in Ireland without having to fulfil any residency requirements. This applies to civil wedding ceremonies, religious wedding ceremonies and secular ceremonies. However, you may choose to avoid the legalities and paperwork involved and have a low-key civil ceremony at a registry office in the UK (to fulfil the legal requirements) followed by a Wedding Blessing in Ireland at a venue of your choice.

Civil Ceremony

In Ireland, civil ceremonies are usually conducted by a Registrar and take place in the local Registry Office, or at an approved wedding venue (i.e. a hotel, castle or estate).

There are no residency requirements for couples wishing to have a civil ceremony. However, you will need to attend an appointment with a Registrar to give at least 3 months notice of your intention to marry. You will also need to meet with the Registrar 5 business days before the wedding ceremony takes place.

These regulations also apply to same-sex couples. It has been legal for same-sex couples to be married in Ireland since 2015.

If you would like more information on the application process and documentation required, download our printable Full Guide to Getting Married in Ireland.  

download full guide

Religious Ceremony

In Ireland, religious ceremonies are legally binding. There are no residency requirements for couples wishing to have a religious ceremony however you will need to attend an appointment with a Registrar to give at least 3 months notice of your intention to marry, in addition to any arrangements you make with your chosen place of worship. You will also need to meet with the Registrar 5 business days before your religious wedding ceremony takes place.

The requirements vary from religion to religion and can be quite complex so it is best to contact the place where you wish to be married well in advance for detailed guidance. Usually, whether you can marry or not depends on whether there are any registered solemnisers available to perform the ceremony at your chosen venue.

If you would like more information on the application process and documentation required, download our printable Full Guide to Getting Married in Ireland.  

download full guide

Wedding Blessing / Humanist Ceremony

In Ireland, it is possible to have a legally binding Humanist ceremony if you follow the procedure for a civil ceremony and use a Humanist celebrant who is a registered solemniser. Alternatively, the private, non-denominational, non-institutional nature of a Wedding Blessing gives you the flexibility to marry whenand how you want with no legalrequirement for the ceremonyto take place in a licensed building. Therefore, you can hold your ceremony wherever you like — at a restaurant, in a private house or your favourite location. The choice is yours. There is also no legal requirement for the ceremony to follow a set structure so it can be as formal or informal as you like. Once again, the choice is yours. These ceremonies are usually performed by a celebrant who will be able to help you select the style, structure, readings, music and vows that reflect your tastes and feelings as a couple resulting in a highly personalised and unique, non-religious ceremony.

Please note: If you do choose to have a Wedding Blessing or a Humanist Ceremony without a registered solemniser, you will also need to have an official civil ceremony in order for your marriage to be legally binding.

If you would like more information on the application process and documentation required, download our printable Full Guide to Getting Married in Ireland.  

download full guide